Saturday, October 02, 2010

My Wish / 我的願望

這個夏天走進好幾個台北的大學校園裡,發現原本的樹林或空地紛紛有工程在進行,高高的鷹架擋住視野,心中不由得升起煩悶之感。

This past summer I happened to find one enormous change among several university campuses I visited in Taipei—there is construction work going on where there used to be flat land. The gigantic scaffolds blocked the view, and the sight of cluttered machinery caused me to feel stressed and fidgety.

之前常和小方讀薇吉尼亞巴頓於1942年寫繪的「小房子」,故事主角小房子原本生活在充滿雛菊和蘋果樹的鄉下,一望無際的視野讓它能夠領略白天晚上和春夏秋冬之美,但隨著都市化的發展,小房子周圍興起各式各樣的高樓大廈和公共運輸,它再也無法感受自然的更迭。最後小房子被遷回鄉下,看起來好像是種解決方式,但從21世紀的觀點來看,我們還有多少鄉下呢?

Von and I would often read Virginia Lee Burton’s The Little House written in 1942. The little house lived in the countryside full of daisies and dancing apple trees. The expanse of land enabled it to experience the beauty of day and night and change of four seasons. However, with urbanization, all kinds of buildings and public transportation were erected around the little house, and it could no longer see anything or feel the change of nature. In the end, the little house was moved back to the country. This looks like a solution. Yet, if we think about the ending from a 21st-century perspective, how many rural areas do we still have left?

哪一天我們才能明白建築物應該因應人各方面的需求,而不是變成建築物的奴隸,而一望無際的視野對於人類的身心發展其實是無比重要的呢?

When can we realize that architecture should meet humans’ mental and physical needs instead of our being the slaves of buildings and the profit they bring? And an expansive view actually matters more than anything else in mankind’s long-term well being?


 
 
 
 




4 comments:

Shorty修替他娘 said...

不知道為什麼?
我很喜歡這幾張圖ㄟ

miragee said...

這樣我就很開心了!

shaggy said...

所以我跑到四處都有樹有草的綠色地方,結果發現大家都來了!

miragee said...

誰叫你在中國呢?